Wednesday, November 04, 2009

LEONARD RAVENHILL TAUGHT THAT THE ETERNAL DESTINATION OF SPECIFIC SOULS IS DEPENDENT ON OUR INTERCESSION


"If we had more sleepless nights in prayer, there would be far fewer souls to have a sleepless eternal night in hell."
(Leonard Ravenhill - "Revival God's Way" - Page 52, [1983])

JOHN WESLEY TAUGHT THE ARMINIAN HERESY OF CONDITIONAL ELECTION


In a word, God, looking on all ages, from the creation to the consummation, as a moment, and seeing at once whatever is in the hearts of all the children of men, knows every one that does or does not believe, in every age or nation. Yet what he knows, whether faith or unbelief, is in nowise caused by his knowledge.
(The Works of John Wesley (Baker Book House, Grand Rapids, MI) (1996) Volume 6 – See Page 227)

JOHN WESLEY'S HERETICAL DOCTRINE OF PERFECTIONISM


What is then the perfection of which man is capable while he dwells in a corruptible body? It is the complying with that kind command, "My son, give me thy heart." It is the "loving the Lord his God with all his heart, and with all his soul, and with all his mind." This is the sum of Christian perfection: It is all comprised in that one word, Love. The first branch of it is the love of God: And as he that loves God loves his brother also, it is inseparably connected with the second: "Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself:" Thou shalt love every man as thy own soul, as Christ loved us. "On these two commandments hang all the Law and the Prophets:" These contain the whole of Christian perfection.

Several persons have enjoyed this blessing, without any interruption, for many years. Several enjoy it to this day. And not a few have enjoyed it unto their death, as they have declared with their latest breath; calmly witnessing that God had saved them from all sin till their spirit returned to God.
(The Works of John Wesley (Baker Book House, Grand Rapids, MI) (1996) Volume 6 – See Pages 413-420)


By perfection I mean the humble, gentle, patient love of God, and our neighbour, ruling our tempers, words, and actions. ... As to the manner. I believe this perfection is always wrought in the soul by a simple act of faith; consequently, in an instant. ... I believe this instant generally is the instant of death, the moment before the soul leaves the body. But I believe it may be ten, twenty, or forty years before. I believe it is usually many years after justification; but that it may be within five years or five months after it, I know no conclusive argument to the contrary.
(The Works of John Wesley (Baker Book House, Grand Rapids, MI) (1996) Volume 11 – Page 446)

JOHN WESLEY BELIEVED IN AN INEFFICACIOUS ATONEMENT


"Destroy not him with thy meat, for whom Christ died," (Rom. xiv. 15,) - a clear proof that Christ died, not only for those that are saved, but also for them that perish:
(The Works of John Wesley (Baker Book House, Grand Rapids, MI) (1996) Volume 7 – Pages 380-381)

"What! Can the blood of Christ burn in hell? Or can the purchase by the blood of Christ go thither?" I answer, ... If the oracles of God are true, one who was purchased by the blood of Christ may go thither. For he that was sanctified by the blood of Christ was purchased by the blood of Christ. But one who was sanctified by the blood of Christ may nevertheless go to hell; may fall under that fiery indignation which shall for ever devour the adversaries.
(The Works of John Wesley (Baker Book House, Grand Rapids, MI) (1996) Volume 10 – Page 297)


Clearly, John Wesley was speaking heretical blasphemies, and was as ignorant of the gospel as the most hardened atheist.

AUGUSTUS TOPLADY'S CORRECT ASSESSMENT OF JOHN WESLEY


"It has also been suggested, that 'Mr. Wesley is a very laborious man;' not more laborious, I presume, than a certain active being, who is said to go to and fro in the earth, and walk up and down in it: nor yet more laborious, I should imagine, than certain ancient Sectarians, concerning whom it was long ago said, 'Woe unto you Scribes, Pharisees, hypocrites; for ye compass sea and land to make one proselyte:' ... Mr. Sellon, moreover, reminds me (p. 128) that, 'while the shepherds are quarrelling, the wolf gets into the sheep fold;' not impossible: but it so happens that the present quarrel is not among 'the shepherds,' but with the 'wolf' himself; which 'quarrel' is warranted by every maxim of pastoral meekness and fidelity."
(Augustus Toplady, Complete Works, p. 54)